357 West Chicago Avenue - Chicago, IL 60654
p. 312.944.3085 f. 312.944.5549 e-mail:
 

Each print is made from a direct contact-negative produced from Brady's original collodion wet-plate glass negative. These fine prints have all the vitality, depth of tone, and hue that Brady's prints possessed when first produced. The plum tone, found in period photographs, is quite evident. Albumen is a natural product; it changes over time. The color takes on a more brown shade. This is why we are accustomed to seeing more brown and less plum when we look at photographs from the day, today. These photographs are what someone looking at them in the 1860s would have seen.

These prints are reproduced on gold-toned, hand coated, acid-free, pure cotton albumen paper--and each is a work of art.

The early photographic techniques used by Brady in the 1860s have been carefully recreated. However, some improvements have taken place: a double-coating of the paper produces dense and vivid images; a high intensity mercury halide light guarantees perfect exposure for each print; and a special final wash produces authentic prints that are exceptionally durable as well as beautiful.

These prints are authorized by the Library of Congress, and produced by special arrangement with the Library; each is certified as authentic.

These prints have a contemporary plum tonality.

When Ordering, Please Use The Titles Above The Photos.

 
 

(Brady, Mathew) Battery No. 4, Yorktown, VA in May, 1862. 11 1/2 x 9 (sight), matted size, 18" x 14".

 
  Price: $400.00

Loading 13-inch seacoast mortars.

 
 

(--) Benson's Battery Horse Artillery, Fair Oaks, VA, June 1862. 11 1/2 x 9 (sight), matted size, 18" x 14".

 
  Price: $400.00

Features the 2nd US Artillery.

 
 

(--) Crossing the Rappahannock River, VA, August 1862. 11 1/2 x 9 (sight), matted size, 18" x 14".

 
  Price: $400.00

Photographed during General Pope's retreat.

 
 

(--) Custer, George A. and Confederate Prisoner James B. Washington, near White House, VA, May 31, 1862. 11 x 10 (sight), matted size, 18" x 14".

 
  Price: $400.00

White House plantation was the home of Martha Dandridge Custis and Daniel Parke Custis, it burned to the ground

 
 

(--) Encampment of the Army of the Potomac, Pamunkey, VA, May 1862. 15 1/2 x 7 1/2 (sight), matted size, 18" x 14".

 
  Price: $400.00

Photographed at the Cumberland Landing.

 
 

(--) Tent Life of the 31st Pennsylvania, Washington, DC, 1861. 10 1/2 x 9 1/2 (sight), matted size, 18" x 14".

 
  Price: $400.00

Photographed at Queens Farm.

 


LINCOLN FROM LIFE: 1854 - 1865

A SERIES OF ALBUMEN-TONED DIGITAL PRINTS DERIVED FROM CONTEMPORARY SOURCES;
GLASS NEGATIVES AND AN AMBROTYPE

  (Lincoln, Abraham) Albumen-toned modern photographs. 8" x 10". Archivally printed on cotton paper, with pigment inks.
 

We have achieved a clarity unmatched for these Lincoln images. You will be delighted by their warmth and intimacy -- you will be amazed by their clarity. In one a fly is clearly evident sitting on Lincoln’s pant leg; in another, scratches on the arm of the chair are noticeable. As well, for the first time, in his last formal sitting the entire image is finally revealed, as are scratches on the chair.

These prints may be considered “from life,” since they each derive from a period glass and are each only one or two generations from the original photographic rendering.

This series encompasses Lincoln from 1854 and his re-entry into politics to stop the nationalization of slavery through his penultimate image as a care-worn, war-time president.

Illinois Politician
Polycarpus Von Schneidau
October 1854
O-6

Notice the tie, Lincoln's hair and fingernails. Also, the Press and Tribune masthead has been stripped in, over another paper's.

Lawyer & Presidential Candidate
Alexander Hesler
June 1860
O-27

Notice the skin quality; emulsion at corner; spectacle string.

Price: $150.00
Price: $150.00

Commander in Chief
Alexander Gardner
August 1863
O-71

Notice the fly on Lincoln's trousers; also, the clarity on the newspaper and the spectacles.

The Gettysburg Lincoln
Alexander Gardner
November 1863
O-77

Notice the facial clarity; wandering left eye; emulsion wave near shoulder.

Price: $150.00
Price: $150.00

We Guarantee these are the most detailed images of Lincoln you have ever seen. If you are not satisfied with them, please return in "as new" condition for a full refund.

 

  Lincoln Photographs black and white-toned modern photographs. 8 x 10. Archivally printed on archival photographic paper, with a warm, matte finish.
 
We have reprinted some of our favorite Lincoln photographs. These photographs are far superior to any thing you can obtain from other sources because our negatives are made from the original prints. Each of these are photographically reproduced by one of the nation's most respected photo labs. When ordering, please use the "O-Numbers." Our regular shipping policy applies.
 
October 1858
0-10
Price: $55.00
c1859
0-15
Price: $55.00
October, 1859
0-16
Price: $55.00
May, 1860
0-20
Price: $55.00
 
May, 1860
0-21
Price: $55.00
June, 1860
0-26
Price: $55.00
June, 1860
0-27
Price: $55.00
August, 1860
0-36
Price: $55.00
 
October, 1862
0-63
Price: SOLD OUT
November, 1863
0-77
Price: SOLD OUT
January, 1864
0-83
Price: $55.00
January, 1864
0-86
Price: $55.00
 
 

Shaw, William. [ABRAHAM LINCOLN O-33] Springfield: approximately June, 1860. 12" x 15".

 
Price: $225.00

As nominee of the Republican Party, photographers descended on Lincoln in order to take his portrait. Shaw traveled from Chicago for this image.

This digital photograph shows the intensity many saw in Lincoln; the abrupt divide of light and shadow gives strength to his features. A London journalist wrote of Lincoln, “An honest old lawyer, with a face half Roman, half Indian, wasted by climate, scarred by a life’s struggle.”

Hand-crafted photograph, derived from a period collodion glass plate negative. Printed on a special black and white receptive acid-free paper.

 

ONE OF THE EARLIEST MUG SHOTS

Original collodion glass plate stereo negative, and the carte de visite created from it.

  Powell, Lewis (Conspirator to Assassinate Lincoln; hanged in 1865). “PAYNE, alias WOOD, alias HALL / Arrested as one of the Associates of Booth in the Conspiracy.” Image taken on board the ironclad Mantauk, April 27, 1865.
 
  Price: $175.00

Alexander Gardner, as Photographer to the Army of the Potomac, was asked to come aboard and take the first photographs of the alleged conspirators.

Taken as a stereo-view, this view and those he took of the other alleged conspirators, were some of the earliest mug shots ever created.

Under the watchful eye of a U.S. Marine Corps guard, Powell helpfully assumed a variety of poses for Gardner. Here he is seen dressed in the clothing he wore the night he attacked Secretary of State William Seward, as Booth was shooting Lincoln at Ford’s Theatre. The solid bar handcuffs that he is wearing were to keep his hands apart.

This hand-crafted 8 x 10 modern photograph was derived from the original collodion glass plate negative and is toned to match the period. It has been printed on a special black and white receptive acid-free paper.

The clarity is superb!

 




When collectors of Lincoln photographs are speaking of specific Lincoln photographic poses, they often reference them by the O-Numbers. The O Numbers, established by Lloyd Ostendorf and Charles Hamilton in the definitive Lincoln photographic reference book, Lincoln in Photographs, are illustrated in the book below.

  Ostendorf, Lloyd
LINCOLN’S PHOTOGRAPHS: A COMPLETE ALBUM
Dayton: 1998. 3rd edition; 437p.; illustrated; d.j.
 
Price: $55.00
This newly revised and titled book remains the basic reference work on Lincoln’s photographs. This edition updates the entire work with newly added material and photographs, with “Ostendorf numbers” now running up to 130. Besides the basic chronology, additional subjects include: signed Lincoln photos; spurious photos; family and friend photos from the family album; and variant uses of Lincoln photos. And, it’s fascinating!
 





  Alexander Gardner
THE "GETTYSBURG LINCOLN"
8 November 1863
An Imperial, 11 x 14 Inch Image Derived From An Original Collodion Wet-Plate Glass Negative
In A Numbered, Limited Edition of 375
EARLY OR SPECIFIC NUMBERS CAN BE RESERVED NOW
 
  An Impressive 11 x 14 Civil War style salt print on a 16 x 20 archival mount. From The trade edition of 375 prints, each individually numbered.
Price: $3,750.00
   
  Select artist proof of the above from the edition of only 85 carefully
chosen prints.

Price: $5,750.00
   
  Deluxe archival frame for the above with custom velvet mats, and UV light protection glass (as pictured)
Price: $1,250.00
   
FOR THE FIRST TIME, photography and Lincoln collectors can obtain an Imperial salt photograph of Alexander Gardner’s famous Lincoln image [Ostendorf #77], taken just 11 days prior to the Gettysburg Address. There is no more powerful image of Lincoln to be had! Truly, “there is the animal himself.”

OUR COLLODION GLASS WET-PLATE, directly derived from the destroyed original imperial-format glass plate, was made to produce salt and albumen photographs. In fact, any time you have ever seen this image of Lincoln, its original derivation was our collodion glass plate!

ONLY ORIGINAL METHODS have been used in this production—the very same methods that Gardner himself would have used in making such photographs. It is exactly these methods that bring us the evocative nature of a 19th century photograph. The size has an unbelievable impact, bringing Lincoln “to life”--warts, war-weary wrinkles, pores, and all! This cannot be a more engaging photo!

THIS PHOTOGRAPH has a clarity and richness that can only be produced from an original early wet-plate. There is much in Lincoln’s face that our photos will reveal which you have not seen before: individual whiskers; penetrating eyes; an incredible skin quality; an unusual definition to the tie and coat, and more.

THAT THIS IS DERIVED from the glass plate is most apparent. The collodion process used is clearly visible, as is the edge of the glass plate.

THE PRODUCTION is by France Scully Osterman, a specialist and educator in wet-plate collodion photography and editor of The Collodion Journal and by Mark Osterman, photographic process historian. They are two of the leading fashioners of the long lost salt photograph from original plates; and it is their skill that allows you to own such a lifelike image of Lincoln.

THESE ARE STRICTLY LIMITED to 375 Numbered Prints and 85 Publisher’s Proofs, each on Authentic Salt-print paper, mounted to a 100% acid-free backing. Presented in a protective 3/4 leather and linen portfolio, with overlaid gold-stamped leather panels. The portfolio is lined with acid-free paper. Included is a wealth of historical material about the print.

WE GUARANTEE that these photographs will delight you; but if not, your money will be immediately refunded. A Certificate of Limitation will accompany each photographic print, which has been discretely blind-stamped, so future generations will not believe they were produced by Gardner himself in the 1860s.

THESE PRINTS will duplicate exactly what Gardner’s artistic eye wished us to see from his plate. It is the equivalent of any Victorian photograph and shows you what the contemporary public might have viewed, if they had been produced. We predict that these photographs will become even more valuable to future collectors.

PLEASE NOTE:
This image does not show the quality of our actual photographic offering, but is for illustration only.

 



“THERE IS THE ANIMAL HIMSELF” -- A. Lincoln

THERE IS NO CLEARER IMAGE OF LINCOLN EXTANT!!

 

Gardner, Alexander.
THE GETTYSBURG LINCOLN.
Albumen Photograph

 

Price: $575.00

This fine photo is taken by Direct Contact from an Inter-Positive Duplicate Negative and a subsequent negative purposely produced for this Authentic Gold-toned Albumen paper. Wet-mounted to 100% rag, mirage board and placed on an uncoated base to prevent curl.

3.5 x 4.5 inches (image) 6.5 x 8.5 inches (overall). Taken on a 1 to 1 equivalent, these prints have been nudged toward a vivid contrast to achieve a clarity never before produced. Truly, “there is the animal himself.” The entire negative is viewed in this photograph.

 
  Alexander Gardner
THE "GETTYSBURG LINCOLN"
8 November 1863
Derived from and original wet-plate glass negative
 
  Your Choice 8 x 10 or 11 x 14
Price: $225.00
   

FOR THE FIRST TIME PHOTOGRAPH AND LINCOLN collectors can obtain a photograph taken from the original Collodion Wet-Plate Glass Negative of Alexander Gardner's famous "Gettysburg" image of Lincoln [O-77].

OUR OFFERING HAS A CLARITY not achieved since Gardner's own originals.

THIS PRINT IS RENDERED on acid-free paper and is hand produced. The enlargement has retained such a fine clarity that the print has surprising power. Hang it at 6' 4" and there is "the animal himself." We have left in most of the glass imperfections, so the image comes alive even more.

YOUR CHOICE OF SIZES, THIS print is a great gift for Lincoln lovers everywhere.

PLEASE NOTE:
This image does not show the quality of our actual photographic offering, but is for illustration only. The print has a warm tonality that is evocative of the era.

  Alexander Gardner
A REMARKABLE LINCOLN PHOTOGRAPH
8 November 1863
Derived fron and original wet-plate glass negative
 
  Price: $525.00

We offer the above 11 x 14 photograph, handsomely and archivally framed. This framed piece measures 16 x 20.

This is a wonderful gift for the Lincoln enthusiast.

 





  Alexander Gardner
LINCOLN'S FIRST GARDNER SITTING
9 August 1863
Imperial 14 x 15 Inch Salt Print Photograph [O-71d]
Derived From An Original Collodion Wet-Plate Glass Negative
 
Numbered, Limited Edition of 375, 14” x 15” Original Photograph on a 16” x 20” Mount.
Price: $3,750.00
   
 

Numbered, Select Artist’s Proof, Limited Edition of 85*
Price: $5,750.00

* If you prefer not to receive the portfolio, please subtract $300 from the cost of the photo Payment Plan Available, Please Inquire

   
  Deluxe archival frame for the above with custom velvet mats, and UV light protection glass (as pictured)
Price: $1,250.00
   
IT WAS A HOT, HUMID SUNDAY WHEN LINCOLN awoke in the Washington’s Soldier’s Home, his summer residence. The Civil War weighed heavily on his mind. “Greatly encouraged” by recent success, however the end was still not “clearly in view.” Soon his secretaries, Nicolay and Hay, arrived and the three gentlemen rode in the closed carriage to the photographic gallery of Alexander Gardner.

THE PRESIDENT SAT DOWN under the big skylight on a small cane chair, a white marble top pedestal table at the left. Gardner gave Lincoln the day’s Washington Chronicle to read. Lincoln kept it as a prop, later varying the poses by moving the newspaper, substituting books and standing so he towered above the table. After the gentlemen left, Gardner developed the wet plates, and decided which pose would make the best single salt print imperial enlargement.

LATER, GARDNER’S BEST POSE WAS TAKEN from the negative rack and an attempt was made to cut it into four equal plates; but the glass severely cracked! The top two exposures were destroyed and only the bottom right one remained reasonably complete. The negatives of the other three poses were either lost or destroyed.

THE SURVIVING NEGATIVE WAS LATER DEPOSITED in the John Hay Library at Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island. The library generously allowed us to produce original prints from this rare wet plate negative.

VIEW LINCOLN’S “FLY”

WE CAN ACTUALLY SEE A FLY that landed on Lincoln’s trouser leg! For the first time we can read the newspaper’s masthead and date, and clearly view the leathery quality of Lincoln’s hand on the paper. This photograph has a clarity and richness that can only be produced from an original early wet-plate.

ONLY ORIGINAL METHODS have been used in this production—the very same methods that Gardner himself would have used in making such photographs. It is exactly these methods that bring us the evocative nature of a 19th century photograph. The size has an unbelievable impact, bringing Lincoln “to life”.

THE PRODUCTION is by France Scully Osterman, a specialist and educator in wet-plate collodion photography and editor of The Collodion Journal. She is one of the leading fashioners of the long lost salt photograph from original plates; and it is her skill that allows you to own such a life-like image of Lincoln.

THESE ARE STRICTLY LIMITED to 375 Numbered Prints and 85 Publisher’s Proofs, each on Authentic Salt-print paper, mounted to a 100% acid-free backing. Presented in a protective 3/4 leather and linen portfolio, with overlaid gold-stamped leather panels. The portfolio is lined with acid-free paper. Included is a wealth of historical material about the print.

WE GUARANTEE that these photographs will delight you. A Certificate of Limitation will accompany each photographic print. The photograph has been discretely blind-stamped, so future generations will not believe they were produced by Gardner himself in the 1860s.

THESE PRINTS will duplicate exactly what Gardner’s artistic eye wished us to see from his plate. It is the equivalent of any 19th century photograph and shows you what the contemporary public might have viewed, had they been produced. We predict that these photographs will become even more valuable to future collectors.

PLEASE NOTE:
This image does not show the quality of our actual photographic offering, but is for illustration only.

 






  Christopher German
THE LOST PHOTOGRAPH OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN
Today's State of Art Archival Iris Giclée Photograph from an Original Collodion Glass Positive
 
An impressive 11 x 14 size on a 16 x 20 mount. From the trade edition of 905 prints, each individually numbered.
Price: $575.00
   
 

Select Artist’s Proof of the above from the edition of only 85 carefully chosen prints.
Price: $875.00

   
  Deluxe archival frame for above with custom velvet mats, and UV light protection glass (as pictured)
Price: $1,250.00
   
ON JANUARY 13, 1861, Abraham Lincoln went to the photographic gallery of Christopher German on the West Side of the Springfield Courthouse Square. German took two almost identical negatives on the sitting. The photographs from the sitting are extremely rare as there but three prints from the first (O-41) and but a single print from the second (O-42).

ALL FOUR PRINTS ARE FROM the second generation negatives and show much retouching in the eyes, left cheek, and forehead. Did any prints from the two negatives before they were retouched and copies survive? The late Lloyd Ostendorf, the foremost authority on Lincoln photographs found none, after searching for over 50 years. Miraculously, this collodion wet plate glass positive survived and has recently been discovered . Even more amazing it is from the rare lost second negative (O-42) that only one known print survives.

BECAUSE ALL OTHER LIFE PRINTS had formerly been clumsily retouched from Gardner's negatives, for the first time in over 140 years we can now see skin texture in Lincoln's high left cheekbone, the bumpiness underneath his eyes, and his worried, furrowed brow. We can even see that the heavy winter wool fabric of his coat had been previously covered by the retoucher's brush.

THE GLASS PLATE IS SO INCREDIBLY SHARP that not only can we see the highlights from the reflecting mirror in Lincoln's eyes, but the secondary light also where it comes through his gray blue eye lens on the other side. There is now a clear nose wing and deep furrows on his bottom lip and Lincoln's skin even looks "ruddy" from the Illinois prairie winter winds that whipped it raw. This is not a faint, retouched old relic of what once was, but an authentic monumental document of the man himself.

BEING ON GLASS, MODERN TECHNOLOGY can convert it to a negative and unretouched prints can be printed from it for the first time. From this rare glass plate, were printed a very small select edition of original photographs. Only recent modern computer technology allows us to convert the old collodion wet plate positive into a negative and then meticulously print an untouched archival iris giclée from it. Although an original glass plate was used, this directly printed giclée photograph is actually superior to anything done in 1861. Because the computer scan is more sensitive to tonal differences; and since the iris giclée printer has over 1200 microscopic jets per inch each containing permanent, archival ink , every nuance in this amazing photograph emerges.

AVAILABLE TO COLLECTORS FOR THE FIRST TIME in over one hundred years, this lost Lincoln photograph is printed and strictly numbered from 1 to 950 with only 85 artists proofs. The are recorded in the Illinois State Historical Library, Springfield, Illinois, and no more will ever be printed as the giclée negative is destroyed.

Requests for special numbers will be honored on a first come basis. Also, you will be offered your chosen number before anyone else for future offerings.

 





  Duplicated from the Original Daguerreotype - Attributed to Christopher S. German
ORIGINAL QUARTER-PLATE DAGUERREOTYPE
Springfield, IL, late September 1858
[Ostendorf - Lincoln in Photographs, #O-9] [Mellon - The Face of Lincoln, pg. 40]
Gold-toned Daguerreotype on clad metal plate, having an additional galvanized silver layer for greater tonality and truer whites and blacks. Finely buffed, as obtained in the 19th century.
 

Price: $3,500.00 - Numbered Limited edition of 85

 
 

"Making the Unobtainable Obtainable"

ONLY ORIGINAL METHODS were used in producing this remarkable image. This daguerreotype is the equivalent of any produced in the mid-1850s, the high point of daguerrean activity. The original daguerreotype is lost, but a fine, clear negative of the original image remains. [Provenance: King Hostick Collection.] Through the skills of Mike Robinson, today's foremost Daguerrian artist, this exciting duplicate daguerreotype has been produced.

THIS IS THE CLOSEST ONE CAN GET TO AN ORIGINAL

AN ORIGINAL CANNOT BE HAD, since a daguerreotype is unique. However, because our old negative was taken directly of the original daguerreotype, we can offer this image to collectors in the original form for the first time since the photo was taken. There is much in the image that this photograph will reveal which could not be seen in later copies: the outdoor coarseness of Lincoln's skin; his penetrating eyes; and a crispness of detail not offered anywhere else. The back of the daguerreotype has been carefully inscribed so that future generations will not believe it was produced in 1858. The brass mat is stamped with the edition number and no more will ever be produced.

OUR GUARANTEE: Only traditional materials and methods were used in the making of this daguerreotype! You will be delighted by the image or your money back.

  • Placed in a Thermoplastic "Union" Case patterned after a Victorian Textured, Central Oval Design with a
    decorative border and burnished gilt hinges.
  • Housed under a numbered Oval Brass Mat bordered by a red velvet mat preserver.
  • Opposite an embossed Decorative Velvet Pad with an original, charming decorative "photographer with his camera" design.
  • Guaranteed indistinguishable from a 19th century image!
 
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